Tag Archives: Corporate Training

How To Make Training Stick

Right around the time “training and development” was the latest in the business lexicon-replacing “corporate education,” I started my career as a facilitator. Three years later, as I moved into instructional design, “training and development” was  passé and “Global Learning” was in. Over the years, department titles may change but the goal remains the same: contribute to business results by improving employee performance through the enhancement of knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or habits; otherwise known as KASH.

The art in this instructional science is to motivate adult learners to:

  1. Remember the new KASH
  2. Adopt what they have learned into their daily practices
  3. Invest their new KASH toward the achievement of the organization’s most desired business objectives

A Hat Trick Accomplished With Finesse Not ForceMaking Training Stick

Motivating adults to learn is a fantastic application of interpersonal influence. Adults cannot be mandated to learn, change their behaviors, or use what is learned to attain certain results. They must be positively persuaded to endure the risk and discomfort of a learning curve. Here is one essential for inspiring adults to learn, change, and apply the difference to impact organizational goals.

Warm up with WIIFM
Pre-learning communication is critical. Adult learners like to know why they are doing something before they are willing to commit to participating. Even if the learning experience is a “mandated” or requisite program, you have to earn participants’ buy-in. Otherwise, their bodies will be present but their hearts and minds remain disengaged.  Without the active participation of all three, the only thing they’ll take away from the experience is the hotel pen and some cookies for their kids.

Regardless of the type of learning (classroom, webinar, elearning, etc),  provide participants with a clear concise explanation of the business reason for the program. Explain how the program fits into the big picture or overall organizational cause. Share the learning objectives, what they will know/be able to do when they are done with the learning experience. Most importantly, provide the performance outcomes they are expected to achieve by applying what they have learned. Participants should be able to use your communication to formulate how they personally will gain from the experience.

Come back soon…More Strategies for Motivating and Influencing Adult Learners Are On The Way…

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Filed under Business, How To, Human Resources, Influence, Talent Development